Skip to main content

Blogs

CTD.jpg

From the Archives: Rheumatology Dead Word Cemetery

I recently heard of a secondary school assignment wherein students were challenged to “bury” a word that was no longer useful or appropriate. Their exercise has now evolved into an unofficial RheumNow task force to retire diagnostic terms that have grown into misuse in rheumatology and medicine. How did we decide which words should perish? And by what criteria? Who has the final say?
life,stage,age,lifespan

Still's disease: paediatrics to adults, a continuum or not?

Dr. Ilenia Di Cola and Dr. Piero Ruscitti
Still’s disease is a rare inflammatory disorder, affecting less than 1 person per 2000 people. This disease may occur in both children and adults, namely as systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) and adult-onset Still’s disease (AOSD). The paediatric form was described by George Still in 1896, whereas the adult variant later by Eric Bywaters in 1971. However only the adult disease is identified by the name of Still.
Stills,continuum

The Still’s Continua

The concept of a “Still’s disease continuum” that encompasses both sJIA and AOSD is based on the many common clinical, genetic and laboratory features shared by both sJIA and AOSD.

thermometer fever adult

AOSD: complicated disease or a disease with complications?

Many clinicians may not have seen a case of AOSD during training, which overall leads to several delays in referrals and appropriate diagnosis for AOSD patients. AOSD is an autoinflammatory disease where innate immunity plays a primary role and is characterized by seemingly unprovoked inflammation, but without the high-titer autoantibodies or antigen specific T cells seen in autoimmune diseases.
reflections,ripple

2021 GRAPPA Recommendations - Looking Back, Looking Forward

With the recent publication of the third iteration of the GRAPPA Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) treatment recommendations, it seems to be an auspicious time to reflect on some key considerations that arose during the development of the recommendations, as well as to look towards what the future may hold.
group,office,people,glue,work

ICYMI: Who is Your Glue?

I’ve often talked about the nurses in my clinic as being the glue, the clinic glue, my personal glue. Without them, the day and task would never go as well and just might crash and burn, if not for their steadying influence.
Thermometer

Five Mistakes When Diagnosing Still’s Disease

Adult-onset Still's presents an interesting and diagnostic challenge when encountered. Here are 5 tips to improve your diagnostic acumen for this febrile disorder.

heel enthesitis spur calcaneal

A Domain-Based Approach to the GRAPPA Psoriatic Arthritis Treatment Recommendations

With their publication in June 2022 (1), the 3rd iteration of the Group for Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA) Treatment recommendations for Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) may have set a record or sorts.

backpain.hip_.jpg (keep)

Pain in Psoriatic Arthritis

Pain is typically ranked by both patients and physicians as the most important symptom of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) to assess and treat. Although the predominant concept of the etiology of pain in PsA is that of inflammation in peripheral joints, entheses, and bone signaling through peripheral nociceptive fibers, perceived as pain in the central nervous system, it is actually more complex than that. The ability of a treatment to ameliorate pain is one of the principle measures of its effectiveness. Thus pain improvement or worsening are key determinants of shared decision making about treatment in PsA. 
pregnant, pregnancy, mother, fertility

Pregnancy and Psoriatic Arthritis

Patient TS was a 30 year old woman who had been living with psoriatic arthritis for about 18 months. Her symptoms had started about 6 months after the birth of her first child with mild psoriasis in her scalp but increasing joint pain in her hands, wrists, elbows, knees, and ankles.

lumbar,spine,lbp,pain

Axial Disease in Psoriatic Arthritis

Inflammatory involvement of the axial skeleton and sacroiliac joints occurs, on average, in 40-50% of patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). When present, axial involvement is a “biomarker” of more severe PsA disease: more severe peripheral joint disease, enthesitis, skin disease, pain, impaired function and quality of life, and work productivity. Thus, it is important to recognize and include in a comprehensive PsA treatment approach.
turmeric CAM

Complementary and Alternative Therapies in Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis

It’s been reported that approximately one-third to one-half of patients with psoriatic arthritis will try supplements and other complementary and alternative medicinal (CAM) practices without discussing with their rheumatologists.  Of those, nearly 90% of PsA patients using CAM report benefits!  Here is your updated review on common supplement data in psoriasis and PsA. 
×